I have a question concerning Cat

Here you will find answers by our team of vets to FAQs to frequently asked questions in relation to Cat, General Considerations

Frequently asked questions about General Considerations:

Our kitten does the “number twos” only in our presence beside the litter tray although it accepted it. What can be the background?

Question:
Our kitten is now 7 ½ weeks old and has been living with us in our apartment for 1 ½ weeks. It has learned that it must use the litter tray (it does it’s “number twos” in the litter tray) however it happens again and again that it pees on the carpet. Can it be that the kitten is still a bit too young to understand the reason for the litter tray or could this be a defect? It is strange that the kitten pees on the carpet only when we are there. How can we make it clear to the kitten that it should use the litter tray?

Answer:
Your kitten is still a baby who is learning what the house rules are. If it uses the litter tray in your absence (that means when it has no distraction), then just ignore the little slip ups. Cats have a natural urge to do their business in a certain location and your kitten has understood that in principle already. If the soiling does not improve in a few weeks and it still pees in the same spot, you could try to put its food bowl exactly there. Take care that the litter tray is always clean (some cats refuse to use once used toilets again). You can also try to put the toilet on the spot it pees on. Then, the tray is pushed back closer in the direction of the original spot step by step each day.

Which measures need to be taken to guarantee that first and second cat can be brought together well?

Question:
We will get a second cat (female) this weekend. The new cat is a British shorthair blue (female, 10 weeks old). My question: how do we do everything right for the first encounter? Simply let them loose on each other or ignore the new cat in front of the “older” cat? Or keep both in separate rooms? We would like to do everything right so that our “second” cat turns out as well as the first. We heard that the new “small one” is relatively shy with humans which was not the case with the “first”. She behaves more like a dog, always follows us everywhere and lovingly “claims” all strangers immediately. We are really looking forward to your reply.

Answer:
You have recognised this quite correctly. The main thing is that the first cat is the main character in this entire event. Take care for the first meeting that your cat is already well fed and does not want to defend her food. Clean everything edible away and do not arrange the meeting exactly in your cat’s favourite spot. Bring the small cat to your cat and pay exaggerated attention to your cat at that moment. The cat has to learn that whenever the small one appears, she will receive a lot of attention. If the small one sleeps, also ignore the older cat. Life in future is best for your cat when the small one is hopping around. If you keep this up for a while (it’s not easy if such a small, cute thing wants your whole attention), both cats will soon be the best of friends.

What do I need to consider when bringing a young, second animal and the older first cat together?

Question:
I have an 11 year old castrated male cat. Now, I would like get a young female or male cat. Do you think the two will get on? What would be better: a young female or a young male cat? What does one need to consider while getting them used to each other?

Answer:
It normally makes no difference with castrated animals whether it is a female or a male cat. Unfortunately, one cannot predict how your male will react. But here some basic rules to make it as easy as possible on him. Your male cat should be the preferred favourite at all times. He can go to his favourite spot and also chase the kitten away sometimes. Pay attention that whenever the kitten is near, you care for and spoil your male particularly and ignore the kitten more. As soon as the kitten is asleep, your male should be ignored. He should experience something positive when the kitten appears (stroking, treats and attention) and nothing negative (all pay attention to the kitten and he gets scolded when he is only checking it out). It is difficult at the start when such a small sweet thing draws all the attention and of course prompts everybody to play with it. But be tactful for the sake of your domestic tranquillity. Your male cat gets the most attention.

What can I do for increased loss of fur during change of fur?

Question:
Both my male cats are losing a lot of hair, they are probably getting summer fur. What can I do? I brush them every day.

Answer:
Changing fur is a very exhausting affair for the cat’s body during which it has higher demands of its food. The food has to contain the essential fatty acids for the growth of healthy summer fur and skin regeneration as well as important vitamins and minerals for the change of fur. During this time, you should feed your cats a special high quality cat food which meets all these requirements. You should take care when selecting the food that it contains Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids and that the food offers additional protection from hair balls in the stomach. Cats do swallow large amounts of hair while cleaning themselves, in particular during shedding, which can twist into a ball in the stomach and can cause stomach infections. Your cats will get a particularly glossy summer fur if you add half a teaspoon of olive oil per day to this food.

Which plants are poisonous to cats?

Question:
Which plants are poisonous to my 2 male cats? So far, I haven’t actually dared to put plants into my flat.

Answer:
You did well to obtain information on the toxicity of plants before buying any. The following can be categorised as very poisonous: spurge, calla lily, oleander, philodendron and ivy. These plants should not get into cats’ mouths as they can cause poisonous symptoms up to death. Other poisonous plants are: bittersweet, hydrangea, mistletoe, yew, box, laburnum, wisteria seeds, lupines, tobacco plants, lily-of-the-valley, delphinium, monkshood, foxglove, solanum, castor oil plant and yew (not the fruit).